The Day-to-Day Impact of Shared Mobility

  • People are more likely to adopt public transportation options if the first and last mile of their trip is taken care of. Since bus or train stops aren’t always in front of someone’s house, getting to the closest station easily brings more people into public transportation
  • With more people using public transportation, less cars will be on the road and congestion will decrease. More people using public transportation also means less government funding is needed to keep the busses and trains running (hopefully, anyway)
  • By making the cost of mobility variable (ie: paying per trip), people will have a better understanding on the amount they spend and perhaps be more encouraged to opt for walking or biking, creating a healthier community of individuals
  • Round-trip carsharing — Access a group of shared vehicles located in designated parking spaces around the city. Vehicles need to be returned back to the same location at the end of the trip
  • One-way carsharing — Access a group of shared vehicles spread across the home area, meaning vehicles can be found either in parking lots or on street. Vehicles can end anywhere within the home area, meaning vehicle does not need to be returned to the same location
  • Bikesharing — Similar to carsharing, bikesharing allows access to a group of shared bikes that are typically in specific stations, though bikes can be parked at any station
  • Ridesharing — Traditionally ridesharing was akin to the notion of carpooling, ridesharing has now taken the form of rides hailed by an app and vehicle driven by an ordinary driver
  • Peer 2 peer — Individuals rent out their vehicles to other people for a fee

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